Social Distancing, Self-Isolation and Physical Activity

 

Social distancing is an approach to limiting the spread of illness in the population by creating physical space between people and limiting the number of people you come into close contact with. All canadians are being asked to practice social distancing to prevent spread of the virus.

Social distancing includes, but is not limited to:

  • avoid person-to-person contact including handshaking, hugging and kissing
  • if possible, limit or consider cancelling group gatherings.
  • if you have meetings planned, consider doing them virtually instead of in person.
  • talk to your supervisor, manager, or employer about the possibility of working from home where possible.
  • whenever possible, spend time in settings where people can maintain a 1-2 metre (3-6 feet) distance from each other.
  • if you have to go into the community for an essential trip via taxi or rideshare, be sure to keep the windows down.
  • avoid visits to long-term care homes, retirement homes, supportive housing, hospices and other congregate care settings.
  • avoid sending children to childcare, if you are able to.
  • consider whether outings and travel are necessary and avoid non-essential trips in the community.

 

Remember: while you may not feel sick, and while we know these measures are an inconvenience, please be mindful of the members of our community who are more vulnerable to COVID-19 than others. we are all in this together.

 

Social Distancing Infographic

Social Distancing Infographic

Self-isolation is when you have been instructed to separate yourself from others, with the purpose of preventing the spread of the virus. Self-isolation when you are sick means that you do not leave home unless absolutely necessary, such as to seek medical care. You must stay isolated until you are feeling well.

 

How to self-isolate (public health Ontario)

Self-isolation: guide for caregivers, household members and close contacts

For information about who should self-monitor or self-isolate visit Ontario’s 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) website

If you think you have 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) symptoms or have been in close contact with someone who has it, use this self-assessment to help determine if you need to seek further care.

People who have been self-isolating because they are experiencing symptoms consistent with COVID-19, or because they have tested positive for COVID-19, should be in self-isolation for 14 days from when their symptoms began, or 48 hours after symptom resolution, whichever is longer. The exception is for people with only cough and no other symptoms; a subset of people have a persistent cough that is not infectious. For people with only cough, the most recent non-cough symptom should be used as the symptom of interest for 48 hours after symptom resolution. There is no longer any requirement for any swabs to assess the resolution of infection. We will continue to update these recommendations as the science and local context evolve.

Everyone, from children to adults, should practice social distancing at this time. While this is in effect, it is still just as important as ever to keep physically active for maintaining both physical and mental well-being. There are plenty of physical activities that can be done around the home. Some ideas include:

  • Online exercise classes
  • Jump rope
  • Stair stepping
  • Planking
  • Lunges
  • Cleaning
  • Weight lifting

 

Going outside for some fresh air, a walk, a run, or a bike ride is okay - just remember to keep at least 2 metres (6 feet) between yourself and others and don’t gather together in groups. Resources:

WHO – Stay Physically Active During Quarantine

Active for Life – 200 Activities You Can do with Kids at Home

Finding Balance – Exercises at the Kitchen Sink

Self-isolation is when you have been instructed to separate yourself from others, with the purpose of preventing the spread of the virus. While in self-isolation, it is still just as important as ever to keep physically active for maintaining both physical and mental well-being. There are plenty of physical activities that can be done around the home. Some ideas include:

  • Online exercise classes
  • Jump rope
  • Stair stepping
  • Planking
  • Lunges
  • Cleaning
  • Weight lifting

 

Please visit WHO – Stay Physically Active During Quarantine for more ideas. While in self-isolation, individuals may still wish to go outdoors for some fresh air. Please follow the below guidelines:

  • If you are a confirmed positive case for COVID-19 or are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19, please self-isolate indoors and open a window for fresh air. Even with mild symptoms, self-isolate indoors.
  • If you are an asymptomatic returning traveller, close contact of potential or confirmed COVID-19 cases we recommend you: o Stay on your property and ensure there is a 2 metres (6 feet) distance from others o If staying on private property is not possible (e.g. an apartment building), limit outside time and go out only once a day. Ensure a 2 metres (6 feet) distance is maintained. o Try to walk during off peak hours to minimize social interaction. o Disinfect high touch areas (e.g. door knobs) on way out. o Conduct proper hand hygiene before going out and after coming back.


Resources: 

Active for Life – 200 Activities You Can do with Kids at Home 

Finding Balance – Exercises at the Kitchen Sink

 

 

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