Effective Monday, March 1, 2021, at 12:01 a.m., the Grey Bruce Health Unit moves to the Green Prevent Level of the Ontario COVID-19 Response Framework.

COVID-19 Vaccine Update: We are currently not booking vaccinations. Please avoid calling in an attempt to schedule vaccinations at this time. For week of March 1, vaccinations will focus on 2nd dose for all LTCH residents; First Responders (Police and Fire); Community Health Care Workers in Highest/Very High Categories; Community Needle Exchange Partners; and over 80 clients. For clients 80 years of age and older - primary care should be reaching out to them directly; and, for those in this group who do not have a primary care provider (or have a primary care provider outside of the Grey/Bruce region, a 1800 # will soon be available to book appointments.

Please do not call your healthcare provider to book an appointment.

Please do not call Health Unit to book an appointment.

Vaccine rollout details

About COVID-19 Vaccines

 

COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective. Health Canada has approved three vaccines for use in Canada. Pfizer-BioNTech was approved on December 9, 2020, Moderna was approved on December 23, 2020 and AstraZeneca was approved on February 26, 2021 Vaccines are an important tool in our response to the pandemic.

For information about these COVID-19 vaccines, see the following resources:

What you should know about the COVID-19 vaccines (ontario.ca)

Public Health Ontario - What You Need to Know About COVID-19 Vaccine

COVID-19 Pfizer and Moderna About Vaccines (gov.on.ca)

Information Sheet Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna COVID-19 Vaccines (gov.on.ca)

 

All vaccines work by providing our cells with instructions on how to produce a copy of a protein that is found on the surface of the COVID-19 virus. Our bodies recognize this protein which is what starts our immune response.

mRNA vaccines provide our cells with instructions on how to produce a copy of a protein that is found on the surface of the COVID-19 virus. Our bodies recognize this protein which is what starts our immune response. mRNA vaccines are not live vaccines and cannot cause infection in the host. mRNA vaccines also cannot alter a person’s DNA.

Resources

What You Need to Know About COVID-19 Vaccine (publichealthontario.ca)

COVID-19 Pfizer and Moderna About Vaccines (gov.on.ca)

 

COVID-19 vaccines are safe. Health Canada only approves a vaccine if it supported by very robust scientific data and evidence.

 

The benefits of vaccination greatly outweigh the risks, and many more illnesses and deaths would occur without vaccines. Vaccines prevent illness and disease, and save lives and livelihoods. You can not get COVID-19 from the vaccine.

 

Similar to medications and other vaccines, COVID-19 vaccines can cause side effects. The most common side effects were similar to other vaccines, such as pain at the injection site and fatigue. No major safety concerns were reported in the data submitted to Health Canada. This safety continues to be monitored. Public Health Ontario provides a weekly summary of Adverse Events Following Immunization in the province. 

 

Learn more about the safety of COVID-19 vaccines, how they work and possible side effects, visit Ontario’s COVID-19 vaccine safety webpage.

 

Other Resources:

At a Glance: Vaccine Regulatory Process in Canada (publichealthontario.ca)

COVID-19 Vaccine Approval Process and Safety (gov.on.ca)

COVID-19: How vaccines are developed (video) - Canada.ca

Vaccine development and approval in Canada - Canada.ca

When they are eligible, vaccines should be offered to individuals without contraindications to the vaccine.

  • The Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine: 2 doses given 21 days apart to individuals who are 16 years of age and older.
  • The Moderna vaccine: 2 doses given 28 days apart to individuals who are 18 years of age and older.

If you have any symptoms that could be due to COVID-19, you should not receive the vaccine at this time. You should also wait 14 days after receiving any other vaccine before receiving the COVID-19 vaccine.

There are special considerations for specific populations including pregnancy, people with autoimmune conditions, people who are immunocompromised and people with severe allergies to vaccine ingredients. If you have questions about if the COVID-19 vaccine is right for you, speak to your health care provider.

Other Resources

SOGC Statement - COVID-19 Vaccination in Pregnancy

COVID-19 Vaccine and Pregnancy Poster

COVID-19 Vaccine Promotion Poster for Healthcare Workers

Yes. Until vaccines are widely available, it is important to continue to protect yourself and others from COVID-19. Keep practicing protective measures such as washing your hands, physical distancing, wearing a mask and following other public health guidance. More research is being done to determine how long the vaccine protection lasts and how well it will prevent others around you from getting sick with COVID-19.

 

 

Share this page