Canadian 24 Hour Movement Guidelines

 

  • The 24-Hour Movement Guidelines represent the first research-based recommendations that encompass the whole day
  • The guidelines show there is an important relationship between how much sleep, sedentary behaviour and physical activity children get in a 24-hour period
  • Preserving sufficient sleep, trading indoor time for outdoor time, and replacing sedentary behaviours with additional moderate to vigorous physical activity can provide greater health benefits.  
  • For easy ways to get started and a variety of ideas to help you build physical activity into your daily routine go to Canada’s Physical Activity Guide to Health Active Living

 

Infants, toddlers and preschoolers (0-4 years) should receive support from their parents and caregivers that allows for an active lifestyle with a balance physical activity, high-quality sedentary behaviour and sleep.

 

A healthy 24 hours for the early years includes:

  • 14 to 17 hours of sleep, including naps, for infants 0 to 3 months
  • 12 to 16 hours of sleep, including naps, for those aged 4 – 11 months, including naps
  • 11 to 14 hours of sleep, including naps, for toddlers 1 – 2 years
  • 10 to 13 hours of sleep, which may include a nap, for preschoolers 3-4 years
  • Consistent bed and wake-up times
  • For infants, being physical active several times in a variety of ways. For those not yet mobile, this includes at least 30 minutes of tummy time spread throughout the day while awake
  • For toddlers, at least 180 minutes spent in a variety of physical activities at any intensity, including energetic plays – more is better
  • For preschoolers, at least 180 minutes spent in a variety of physical activities spread throughout the day, of which at least 60 minutes is energetic – more is better
  • Not being restrained for more than an hour at a time (e.g., in a stroller or high-chair)
  • No more than one hour per day of screen time – less is better. Screen time is not recommended for those younger than 2 years

 

Watch this interactive video to learn more! 

For optimal health benefits, children and youth (5 – 17 years) should achieve high levels of physical activity, low levels of sedentary behavior, and sufficient sleep each day. Getting more active during the day can help children sleep better at night.

 

A healthy 24 hours for children and youth includes:

  • 9 to 11 hours sleep per night for children aged 5 to 13 years
  • 8 to 10 hours sleep per night for teens aged 14 to 17 years
  • Consistent bed and wake-up times
  • At least 60 minutes of accumulated moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) each day
  • Vigorous physical activities and muscle and bone strengthening activities at least three days per week
  • Several hours of light to moderate physical activity throughout the week
  • No more than two hours per day of recreational screen time
  • Avoid sitting for extended periods

 

Check it out! Build Your Best Day  is a fun, interactive and educational tool to help children and youth aged 5-17 and their parents learn about the Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines

 

 

Canadian Physical Activity Guidelines for Adults

To achieve health benefits, adults aged 18-64 years should accumulate at least 150 minutes of moderate- to vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity per week, in bouts of 10 minutes or more.
It is also beneficial to add muscle and bone strengthening activities using major muscle groups, at least 2 days per week.
More daily physical activity provides greater health benefits.

 

Canadian Physical Activity Guidelines for Older Adults

To achieve health benefits and improve functional abilities, adults aged 65 years and older should accumulate at least 150 minutes of moderate- to vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity per week, in bouts of 10 minutes or more.
It is also beneficial to add muscle and bone strengthening activities using major muscle groups, at least 2 days per week.
Those with poor mobility should perform physical activities to enhance balance and prevent falls.
More daily physical activity provides greater health benefits.

 

Adult Physical Activity

56% of Grey Bruce adults are getting enough exercise, which is similar to the Ontario rate

Youth Physical Activity

64% of youth in Grey Bruce are getting enough exercise, which is similar to the Ontario rate

 

 

Read the full Physical Activity, Fruit and Vegetable Consumption: CCHS 2015-16 Grey Bruce Part 1 report here

 

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